Presentation of the Apartments

Two excellent tourist flats in the heart of the historic centre of Genoa: the apartment “Rose”, 60 m2, accommodates up to 4 people, the apartment “Maria”, 98 m2 up to 6 people. Both are tastefully decorated and fully equipped to make your stay comfortable. Free WiFi up to 20mbs is available. All areas of great interest are within a few minutes walking distance. The center is in fact entirely pedestrianized and allows you to move from both apartments in every direction.

The center of the historic town

The center is in fact entirely pedestrianized and allows you to move from both apartments in every direction: the area of Aquarium, the largest in Europe, where the ferries leave to Portofino and the Cinque Terre as well as the “children’s-town”, an entire hall dedicated to the youngest. Nearby you find also the Cathedral of San Lorenzo, Palazzo Ducale, the Opera House “Carlo Felice”, the most famous museums and the magnificent Via Garibaldi which is located a few meters from apartment Rose.

History

Art and Architecture

This essay on Medieval Genoa is written by Professor Stephen A. Epstein of the History Department of the University of Colorado, Boulder, and Professor George L. Gorse of the Art History Department of Pomona College, Claremont, CA

After visiting Genoa in 1352, Petrarch (Le familiari, 14, 5, 23-5) wrote an important, early humanist laudation to city life, stressing the close relationship of Genoa to Nature and the landscape in an idealized, Virgilian pastoral-arcadian mode: “[Genoa] seemed to me not an earthly place, but a celestial abode which the poets place in the Elysian Fields, as the peaks of the hills [rise] with their amenable paths [above] the fertile little valleys and in these valleys [live] happy people. Who would not have gazed with amazement from high [on the surrounding hills] at the towers and palaces, nature vanquished by man, the rough hills covered by citrons, vineyards and olive groves, the buildings of marble at the foot of the hills, second to no one in royalty and enviable to any city?”
Art and architecture in medieval Genoa played a major role in creating this idealized, Golden Age classical image of the city–a rebirth of Mediterranean trading cities, to cite Henri Pirenne–in symbiotic relationship to its natural harbor site: a maritime theatre of art representing the particular interests of business, family, religious and communal patrons. Three themes are central to Genoese medieval art and architecture: appropriation, spoliation, and transformation.
From its Lombard background and Mediterranean ascent, Genoa appropriated diverse cultures, representing its feudal and […]

Economic Life

This essay on Medieval Genoa is written by Professor Stephen A. Epstein of the History Department of the University of Colorado, Boulder, and Professor George L. Gorse of the Art History Department of Pomona College, Claremont, CA

 

Genoa and its region, Liguria, include the 331 kilometers of coast from just west of Ventimiglia to around Portofino. The medieval city also eventually controlled the mountainous region that circumscribes this rocky coast, and part of the hilly land to the north, on the fringe of the Po valley. Genoa’s economy, however, did not thrive on local agriculture because Liguria contains little flat land and few areas of good soil. Blessed with almost no minerals and few natural resources, apart from its beech and chestnut forests, Genoa’s hardy people turned to the sea. No sizeable rivers enter the sea along its stretch of coast, and the fishing was poor because the sea bed dropped quickly, producing deep and relatively barren waters. Genoa’s main natural advantage was its good harbor, the northernmost one along this coast. The harbor, and the shorter but still arduous passes through the mountains, made Genoa the port of the upper Po valley.
The earliest phase of the medieval Genoese economy, only illuminated in the tenth and eleventh centuries, marked its first efforts to establish maritime trade. Local agriculture produced wine, olive oil, and other bulky commodities more easily moved by sea than land, and the local forests yielded a good mix of timbers for building ships. This early trading phase […]

History and Municipal Institutions

This essay on Medieval Genoa is written by Professor Stephen A. Epstein of the History Department of the University of Colorado, Boulder, and Professor George L. Gorse of the Art History Department of Pomona College, Claremont, CA

 

The classical Genua was a modest Roman provincial town at the head of the gulf of Liguria, and on the great Via Julia Augusta, the coastal road connecting Italy and the western provinces. With the collapse of the empire in the western Mediterranean region in the fifth century, Genoa became part of the Ostrogothic kingdom. From 537 to 42 the Byzantines ruled the city and probably established its maritime traditions. The periods of Lombard (641/2-774) and Carolingian (774-ninth century) rule are the most obscure in Genoa’s history. Muslim raiders from North Africa sacked Genoa in 934/5. No local records survived this attack, and the city may have been abandoned for a few years.
A document from 958 reveals a refounded town eager to reassert local laws and property rights. Local nobles, the bishop, and townspeople struggled for power and Genoa’s theoretical overlords, the kings of Italy and Obertenghi and Malaspina lords of Liguria, were usually occupied elsewhere. By 1016 the city’s naval strength had recovered and it joined with Pisa in attacking Muslims on nearby Sardinia. A charter of 1056 reveals that the Genoese enjoyed a generous measure of self-rule, but the city’s actual governing institutions remained unknown, until the medieval commune emerged in 1099. In that year, the historian Caffaro informs us, a […]

Physical Characteristics and Origins

This essay on Medieval Genoa is written by Professor Stephen A. Epstein of the History Department of the University of Colorado, Boulder, and Professor George L. Gorse of the Art History Department of Pomona College, Claremont, CA

Genoa is a maritime theatre. Like a Greek theatre, the Apennines branch from the Alps, dramatically framing this natural, semi-circular harbor, the center of Liguria, one of the most “picturesque” regions of Italy. Rugged mountain passes insulate Genoa and its smaller coastal dependencies from the rich Po river valley of Lombardy to the north, pushing these port settlements toward the sea, the source of their wealth and fame. The Bisagno and Polcevera valleys slice into Genoa on east and west, only partially relieving the dense, restricted, vertical landscape from the harbor to the mountains above. Narrow coastal plains and harbor enclaves interrupt the mountainous cascade into the sea. This rough terrain is punctuated by medieval family castles and religious sanctuaries, which divided the landscape into local fiefs (feudi), overlaid by Renaissance and Baroque terraced villas, gardens, and farms, all facing the sea. These aristocratic residences tower over small fishing villages and maritime trading centers, lacking sufficient agricultural production and therefore dependent on external import to support the population from other parts of Italy and the Mediterranean. The result is a social, political, economic, and cultural emporium of diverse influences from northern Europe and the Mediterranean.
Genoa always faced the sea. Shrouded in fragmentary archaeological and literary evidence, Genua probably originated in the sixth century […]

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